Is it really a “Resort Fee”?

Facility Fee? Chain Hotel? Is it really a Resort Fee?

 

While generally referred to as a “Resort Fee”, additional fees can take on all shapes, sizes and names. Here are three examples of industry Resort Fees, the first being a legitimate Resort, the second pushing the boundaries and the third being a downtown location charging a uniquely named ‘facility fee’.

 

A Resort in Nashville? It’s true!

Gaylord Opryland Nashville

Gaylord Opryland

The Gaylord Opryland is a legitimate resort, and they offer a number of really interesting value add-ons that make this $18 Resort Fee one of the better values in the industry. Above average Inclusions include bottled water, access to an indoor atrium with wildlife, as well as a guided boat tour inside and outside of the property.

 

Boundaries of the usage of the term Resort

Econo Lodge Maingate Central in Kissimmee Florida

Econo Lodge Maingate

The slippery slope of fees. Granted I’ve never stayed here but I’ll take liberties and assume that most wouldn’t refer to the Econo Lodge as a ‘Resort’, which makes even the small fee of $5.64 dubious at best.

 

Resort in the Middle of Manhattan?

The Roger NYC

The Roger in NY

To be fair, the hotel names their fee as a ‘facility fee’, yet the only facilities that it really provides is a fitness center. Does booking a hotel room itself not allow one use of the facility. A Resort Fee by any other name?

The Roger’s $30+ with tax fee includes:

  • WIFI
  • Manager hosted cocktail hour weekdays from 5 PM – 6 PM,
  • Unlimited local and domestic long distance calls
  • 24 hour use of the fitness center.

 

While the term can differ from Resort Fee, Facility Fee, Amenity Fee, or Usage Fee, the end result remains the same– charges will be added to your bill upon checkout.

For more information on why these exist view the Resort Fees FAQ

  

 

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